The Wynnes of Hazelwood Hous e
Enniskillen Origins The   earliest   document   in   the   archive   is         a   copy   of   an   association   entered   into   by   the   subscribing   inhabitants   of Enniskillen,    about    150    in    number,        under    Gustavus    Hamilton,    whom    they    accepted    as    their    commander    and governor of the town (13 February 1688/1689). The   mounted   regiments   which   were   formed   from   the   Enniskilleners   were   one   of   horse,   under   the   command   of William   Wolseley,   and   two   of   dragoons,   under   the   command   respectively   of   Sir   Albert   Conyngham   and   James Wynne.   The   horse   regiment   was   soon   broken         up   and   one   of   the   papers   (letter   of   17   February   1689/1690)   directs that   troopers   in   it   who   refuse   to   be   'broke         [ie   drafted]   into'   Sir Albert   Conyngham's   dragoons   are   to   be   punished   by the confiscation of their horses. Wynne's Dragoons The   greater   part   of   the   papers   relate   to   Wynne's   Dragoons.   They   seem   to   have   been   initially   a   most   undisciplined lot,   as   an   autograph   letter   of   7   March   1689/1690   from   Marshal   Schomberg   (the   Williamite   general   in   Ireland),   written from   Lisburn,   orders   the   arrest   of   Capt.   Hugh   Galbraith   on   account               of   disorders   committed   by   members               of   his troop. A   further   letter   from   Schomberg   of   27   March   1690   orders      the   arrest   of   two   members   of      Galbraith's   troop   for entering the house of John Crosier near  Enniskillen and killing the owner. On   23   October   1690   disorders   by   the   Enniskillen   troops   gave   rise   to   specific   censure.   However,   this   phase   seems   to have   passed,   for   a   letter   of   3   May   1692   says   that   Wynne's   Dragoons   'bore   a   good   character   with   all'.   Wynne's Dragoons,   being   required   both   as   scouts   and   to   check   any   local   outbreak   were   continually   on   the   move.   In   February 1690   Colonel   Wynne   was   given   the   freedom   of   Londonderry   City.   In   June   1690,   his   regiment   received   orders   to march   to   Belturbet,   and   on   16   June   received   an   order   signed   by   William   III   himself   to   move   to   join   the   rest   of   the army   between   Armagh   and   Tanderagee.   After   the   Boyne   it   appears   to   have            been   stationed   around   Mullingar.   On      18   Dece   1690   an   order   was   issued         for   it   to   go   to   Enniskillen,   and   in   Jan   1690   it   appears   to   have   been   quartered along   the   left   bank   of   the   Foyle      between   Inishown   and   Raphoe.     A   letter   of   3   May   1692      shows   that      there   had   been continual   bickering            with   the      locals,   high   and   low,   over   quartering,   on   the   ground   that   the      settled   allowance   was too small.  In May 1691 the corps was again at Belturbet, but soon marched south,     for it appears at Athlone in  June 1691. Here   the   cavalry   were   apparently   set   to   work   at   the            trenches   like   infantry,   to   their   considerable   disgust.   By   October     1691   the   country   had   apparently   been   exhausted   by   continual   requisitions,      for   an   officer   writing   from   Breckagh   says 'there is not a bit of grass for four miles, the country being ruined by O'Donnell's men'. Foreign Service In   1694   the   regiment   was   in   France,   having   lost   half   a   troop   at   sea,   apparently   when   crossing   from   Ireland.   Here   one of   the   Wynnes   (probably   Owen),   serving   as   major   in   his         brother's   regiment,   was   taken   prison         are   subsequently released.   About   June         1695   Colonel   James   Wynne   was   wounded   and   died   within   the   following   two   months,   being succeeded by Owen Wynne. In January 1696 the regiment was at Bruges, probably in winter quarters. From   this   point   the   papers   become   accounts   rather   than   anything   else,               but   include   the   interesting      information that,   for   example,   in   July   1697   officers   were   receiving   their         pay   in   lottery   tickets   on   the   Malt   Fund;   these   tickets were  exchangeable for cash but only   at a heavy discount. In Peacetime Among   the   later   papers   is   an   undated   recommendation   for   Commissioners   of   Array   in   Cos   Sligo   and   Leitrim, probably   in   1715. Another   undated   paper   of   post-6 August   1732   gives   a   list   of   the   officers   of   Wynne's   Dragoons   with the dates of their commissions. In 1735, there is  another list of the  officers of Wynne's Dragoons. In   c.1737   there   is   a   draft   or   copy   of   a   petition   from   (Lt-Colonel)   Owen      Wynne   soliciting   to   succeed   General   Wynne, deceased,    as    Governor    of    Londonderry.   There    are    two    groups    of    interesting    documents    relating    to    barracks: estimates    of    c.1730    by   Thomas    Burgh,    Engineer    and    Surveyor-General    for    Ireland,    for    building    a    barrack    at Lurganboy,   Co.   Leitrim,   and      memorials,   estimates   and   a   plan   of   c.1756-1761   submitted   by   Lt-Colonel   Owen   Wynne to the Lord Lieutenant, the Duke of Bedford, for repairs to the barrack in Sligo. Later   documents   (of   a   non-military   nature)   include   a   commission   of Andrew   Wynne   as   sheriff   of   Co.   Sligo,   1721,   an Exchequer   writ   of   summons   directed   to   Owen   Wynne,   1755,   and   an   Are   a   are   are   a   small   and   mainly   regimental archive,   1689-1767   and   1783,   derive   from   an   Irish   family   of   that   name      related   to   the   Wynnes   of   Hazelwood,   Co. Sligo,   and   Lurganboy,   Manorhamilton,   Co.   Leitrim.   The   family      appears   to   have   had   many   connections   with   the regiments   which   were   formed   from   the   Enniskillen   contingents      at   the   beginning   of   1690. The   papers   relate   mainly   to military administration. There are (surprisingly) no  references to actual fighting, except abroad.
Wynnes of Hazelwood Chronology Owen II 1664 - 28th Feb 1736/7 1664 Born. 28th Feb 1736/7 Died at Hazlewood, 17th Jun 1737 Probate. Owen III 1686/7 -1756 1686 or 87 Born Married Catherine FFOLLIOT  1702 -  1729   Birth of daughter Hannah  1702 -  1723 Birth of daughter Lucy  1702 -  1732  Birth of son James about 1720     Birth of son John 1723       Birth of son Owen IV 1748              Death of son James 1756 Died Owen IV    1723 - 19th Mar 1789 1723 Born 1754 - 1783 Birth of son Henry Rev Elder 1754 - 1790 Birth of daughter Elizabeth 1754 Married Anne MAXWELL  1754 - 1790 Birth of daughter Judith  1754 - 1790 Birth of son John 1754 - 1779 Birth of son Richard (Rev) 1755 Birth of son Owen V of Hazelwood MP  1760 Birth of son Robert 1763 Birth of daughter Catherine  in Sligo about 1780 Birth of son William Henry 19 Mar 1789 Died Owen V of Hazelwood MP  1755 - 12th Dec 1841 1755 Born Jan 1790 Married Lady Sarah Elizabeth COLE in                                                      Florence Court, Co. Fermanagh 1790 – 1826 Birth of son Owen d y 1790 – 1797 Birth of daughter Anne 1790 – 1826 Birth of daughter Sarah Frances 1790 – 1812 Birth of daughter Florence  1790 – 1826 Birth of daughter Elizabeth 20 Apr 1801 Birth of son John Arthur 6 Sep 1802 Birth of son William Willoughby (Rev) 12 Apr 1812 Death of daughter Florence. Died unmarried             22 Oct 1829 Death of daughter Anne  in childbirth 14 Mar 1833 Death of Lady Sarah Elizabeth COLE 12 Dec 1841 Died John Arthur  20 Apr 1801 - 19 Jun 1865  1838 - 1849 Birth of daughter Sarah   1838 - 1849 Birth of daughter Grace Florence  7 Apr 1838 Married Lady Anne Wandesforde BUTLER  5 Feb 1843 Birth of son Owen VI  24 Nov 1847 Birth of son James  27 Nov 1849 Death of Lady Anne Wandesforde BUTLER  19 Jun 1865 Died Owen  VI 5 Feb 1843 Born  1 Nov 1870 Married Stella Fanny GORE-BOOTH 1870 – 1878 Birth of daughter Muriel Caroline Louisa 1870 – 1886 Birth of daughter Evelyn Mary 1870 – 1887 Birth of daughter Dorothy Adelaide 1870 – 1887 Birth of daughter Madeline Mary 1 Mar 1887 Death of Stella Fanny GORE-BOOTH                                `                'accidentally killed, 27th Feb
The Wynne Papers
Are    a    small    and    mainly    regimental    archive,    1689-1767    and 1783,   derive   from   an   Irish   family   of   that   name      related   to   the Wynnes      of      Hazelwood,      Co.      Sligo,      and      Lurganboy, Manorhamilton,   Co.   Leitrim.   The   family      appears   to   have   had many   connections   with   the   regiments   which   were   formed   from the    Enniskillen    contingents        at    the    beginning    of    1690.    The papers    relate    mainly    to    military    administration.    There    are (surprisingly) no  references to actual fighting, except abroad.
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